Archive for the ‘UP Ibalon’ Category

UPCAT—The Movie Links UP Ibalon And UPAA

March 2, 2009

There is a bunch of inspired members common to UP Ibalon Alumni and the UP Alumni Association of Camarines Sur. Inevitably, both organizations teamed up when the latter brought the premiere of UPCAT –the Movie to Naga City on Feb 28, 2009.

UPCAT–the Movie is an independent film that features upstart talents: Felix Roco, Hiyasmin Neri, Director Roman Carlo Olivarez, scriptwriter Alfred Reyes, and producer Joselle Acuña.

According to Director Roman Carlo Olivarez passing the UP College Admissions Tests (UPCAT) has become a common symbol of hope and dreams of the Filipino youth in their quest for intellectual excellence, a commodity that young people appreciate more personally as tough global competition stares then right in the face in the 21st century. This Communication Arts graduate of La Salle says he has no intention of creating a mystique around UPCAT, but its compelling symbolism is so significant and so timely UPCAT deserves to be a movie title. (You can view our video interview with Director Roman Carlo Olivare at our other website www.upibalon.com).

The UP Ibalon Bicol is happy to have supported the premiere of UPCAT—the Movie in Naga City, indirectly cheering up independent film makers and teaching the Filipino youth to dream.

Producer Joselle Acuña, also a UP alumna, promises to be back to Bicol for a sequel to UPCAT. She likes Bicol to be the setting and she likes to feature stories of real-life UP graduates. (You can view our video interview with Joselle at our other website www.upibalon.com).

Many Ibalonians of course have life stories worth telling. (Mighty be prepared to tell your story).


Acknowledgment: All photos in this post courtesy of Director Roman Carlo Olivarez, who had his Nikon digital SLR camera handy all the time.

Go to our other website www.upibalon.com for more photos and videos related to this activity.

UP Ibalon with Physicians for Peace in Naga City

February 7, 2009

The Physicians for Peace gave out free wheelchairs to pre-screened indigents in Naga City. UP Ibalon Bicol was a partner in this project and may act as conduit for future donations by the Physicians for Peace, an international charity organization headed by a Fil-American, Dr. Juan Montero.

This partnership of the UP Ibalon and the Physicians for Peace came as a result of the efforts of Dr. Josephine (Jenny) Robredo-Bundoc, a UP Ibalon alumna and currently a world consultant of the physicians’ group. Jenny is the younger sister of UP Ibalon Bicol president, Butch Robredo and Naga City Mayor Jesse Robredo.

The wheelchairs were pre-fabricated and the UP Ibalon members had the fun of their life assembling the equipment. The activity was a satisfying spiritual experience for Ibalonians, having been exposed to disabled while having the capability to offer help, however small.

Having grassroot reach in the city’s 27 barangays, the members of the Kapisanan ng Sangguniang Barangay Kagawad (KSBK) Naga City chapter had searched for recipients. Lolit Nantes heads the KSBK as President.

The City Social Welfare Department further screened the recipients.

Watch the video above and share the fun.














Physicians for Peace, UP Ibalon, and civic-minded Naga residents conduct the free wheelchair project

February 6, 2009

Wheechair and Limb Prosthetics Project
by Ann Mariano

On Thursday February 5, 2009, the wheelchair and prosthetics project spearheaded by Ibalonians Dr. Josephine (Penny) R. Bundoc and Jose (Butch) Robredo pulled through in Naga City with the participation of the Physicians for Peace, the city government, and the Rotary Club.

Held in Naga City Gymnasium on a hot humid day, the setting up of wheelchairs for the indigent disabled was made possible with the help of Rene Fornoles, Totoy Badiola, Tess Avenido-Arbo, Sieg Borromeo-Bulaong, Jun Olin, Dr. May Velasco-Yorobe, Alaine Alberto-Fornoles, Lala Moreno, Ann Mariano and Dr. Andy Gimpaya— all kind-hearted Ibalonians.

The humanitarian project started with the usual registration. Dr. Bundoc went ahead with the free screening and interviews of patients, some of whom were referred to the UP-PGH in Manila for further evaluation and management. Prosthetic limb technicians came to make casts for the handicapped indigents. The last to be fitted was Sandy Valleno, a former reporter and stroke victim.

Representing the Physicians for Peace was Dr. Juan Montero. The said founder of the philanthropic organization came all the way from the United States to make available the free wheelchairs and distribute medicines for the needy.

Friends of UP Ibalon who attended were Naga City Mayor Jesse M. Robredo and his team of government workers headed by Lolit Nantes, the president of Kapisanan ng Sangguniang Barangay Kagawad. Community leaders Charlie Ravanera and Achilles Lo of the Rotary Club and civic-minded Waging Manlangit-Tam were there to lend logistical support.

The indigent recipients who spoke of their disabilities and illnesses were grateful to have their donated wheelchairs. Scheduled on the 3rd week of March 2009, the next and final leg of the project will involve distribution of limb prosthesis. (Photo Credits: Sieg Borromeo-Bulaong; Donnamarijne)




NOTE OF THANKS

UP Ibalon extends its thanks to all those who helped in making this project possible including the unnamed supporters and contributors of this civic exercise. =0=

RELATED BLOG: “UP Ibalon Alumni-Bicol pursues its wheelchair & leg prosthesis project for indigents” Posted by mesiamd at 1/09/2009

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UP Ibalon Alumni-Bicol pursues its wheelchair & leg prosthesis project for indigents

January 9, 2009

Ibalonian Annaliza Mariano relays the progress of UP Ibalon’s plan of helping needy patients of Naga and neighboring towns who may benefit in the wheelchair and artificial limb project spearheaded by fellow Ibalonian and UP-PGH Rehab Medical Specialist Dr. Josephine R. Bundoc.

The group’s president Butch M. Robredo encourages members and friends to participate in this worthy charitable project. Here below is a clip from a newspaper which describes the activity set for February 6, 2009:

DOCTORS, UP ALUMNI TO DOLE OUT FREE WHEELCHAIRS, ARTIFICIAL LEGS
by Bicol Mail (01/08/09)

“Naga City – The Physicians for Peace, an affiliate of the 700 Club,
and the UP Ibalon Alumni Association in Bicol will be donating free
wheelchairs and artificial legs to patients and amputees here and in
the neighboring towns comprising Metro Naga.

Kapisanan ng mga Sangguniang Barangay Kagawad (KSBK) President
Lolita Mancera-Nantes said the project is contained in the social
responsibility agenda of the medical organization in partnership with
the reputable alumni association of the University of the Philippines
in Bicol headed by Butch Manalastas Robredo.

Nantes said Dr. Josephine R. Bundoc of the Physicians for Peace and
the group led by Robredo will initially be distributing wheelchairs
and artificial legs in the city through the KBSK of which the members
are now preparing a list of beneficiaries.

Dr. Bundoc’s group is expected to arrive at the Naga City Gym on
February 6 for the distribution of wheelchairs along with the UP
alumni.

‘Initially they will be distributing 100 wheelchairs at the Naga
City Gym and to see also the amputees who want to avail of free
artificial legs to determine what length and size would fit them,’ said Nantes…”
=0=(Photo Credit: Renier&Rene)

For a complete report, please see Bicol Mail, January 8, 2009 issue, page. 3 or http://www.bicolmail.com (Vol. XXV No. 30 | January 8, 2009 )—Annaliza Mariano/Waterliliesnaga

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We Knew At The Very Start That UP Ibalon Cannot Be A Political Organization

December 1, 2008

by Mighty Baylon


When martial law was declared in 1972 all student organizations in UP was banned. After all, there is even a presidential decree which says that any group of three persons is an “illegal assembly”. And if this three persons talk they will even be guilty of “rumor-mongering” which is punishable by imprisonment! I even remember an incident with Nestor Raneses in the waiting shed going to Yakal Residence Hall from Molave. We intended to eat dinner in Yakal cafeteria and we were waiting for the rains to subside. There was another two students who were waiting for a bus.

Out of the rain a police patrol car came and directed us to “disperse” since they said we constituted an “illegal assembly”. We didn’t even know the two others who were sharing the waiting shed with us and we were only intent on filling our hungry stomachs without getting wet. Good we were not talking when the police car appeared.

So, then, when lighting a cigarette and you no match available, it is not healthy to say “Pasindi po (Can I have a light?) if the smokers are already in a group of two.

Up to 1974, troopers of the Metrocom would sweep at dorms and drag out “subversives”. The parking lots of the residence hall were ambush areas where residents can be simply dragged away in the night. Even students going out of the classrooms can be picked up by waiting burly men.

In 1974, chapters of the national-democratic (ND) mass organizations like the KM are being disbanded and converted into legal organizations since they were ineffective anyway under the ‘white terror’ unleashed by Marcos.

It was only in the school year 1974-75 when student organizations were again recognized by the OSA (Office of Student Affairs). But not all organizations were recognized since some are proscribed–the mass organizations of whatever persuation, the fraternities, and some particular organizations like the UP Muslim Students Association (which was founded by a firebrand named Nur Misuari) and a UP Chinese students society which is suspected of mainland China links.

To form an organization that has obvious political leanings in those days is simply purchasing a one-way ticket to Camp Crame. Student organization are targets of infiltration then by intelligence agents who pretended to be students. Even UP Ibalon experienced two attempts of this (and this partly explains the feelings of some applicants that it was too hard to get to be accepted as member of Ibalon in those days).

Worse than Crame is Camp Vicente Lim in Canlubang (which produced more chills on the spine of activists). The name of Abadilla was then spoken with terror–electric wires to the genitals, an overdose of water and splints under the nails readily come to the minds of activists when that name is heard. Being beaten black and blue is considered a minor case of torture in those days (Ginulpi lang ako, pare).

But more than this danger we knew UP Ibalon can not be a political organization because if it is it cannot become the “home of Bicolanos” and we will lose our purpose in being.

When we analyzed UP Paglaom, our conclusion was that it was a social organization. Anyone is automatically a member when he or she fills up its application form and pays its membership dues. Aside from the party, it has no other major activity. And we did not want that kind of organization.

“Why not make UP Ibalon a political organization?”, Tibo David, a political, rhetorically asked.

The conclusion was that only activists and politicals will then be drawn into the organization and it is the surefire recipe for us to become isolated and the danger of other Bicol organizations sprouting will then be max. It should be understood that an outside threat from another organization hangs over our head then [See my article, “The Formation And Legacy Of UP Ibalon: A Testimony”, 11/14/08]. We knew we will then blow all chances that we will be accepted by the Bicolanos in UP as their organization if we ever become a political organization. So we knew that even converting UP Ibalon after foundation is suicidal to the organization.

It is obvious that the politicals of twenty years after 1974 have no understanding whatsoever of the realities that exist when UP Ibalon was founded. There is simply no historical basis where a political organization of Bicolanos can exist in 1974. Now, isn’t the term “political organization of Bicolanos” an oxymoron? One thing I know is we were not morons when we founded UP Ibalon. But I suspect that believing in UP Ibalon “history” that came from outside sources when the founders and seniors members of UP Ibalon are still alive is probably moronic.

The False Version Of UP Ibalon History And Orientation

December 1, 2008

by Mighty Baylon


In the four academic years that I have been on-and-off a resident member of UP Ibalon (this covers the school years that started in the years 1974 to 1977 but his stretches up to March 1978), a total of about 110 members entered the organization. This includes the 19 doctors of medicine that I already wrote about [“The MDs of UP Ibalon Of Earlier Years”, 11/15/08]. With my own eyes I have seen Ibalon grow big and flourish.

When I left UP Diliman it had nearly 90 members and its membership roll was still young, unlike when we first started out. Among the 90 are scions of the more prominent families in Bicol as do sons and daughters of teachers. We thought we had the best and the brightest of the Bicolanos in UP. Almost all graduated on time, the Bicolano holders of major scholarships are in the organization and so do those passed the entrance exam of the PSHS.

We even had a putative alumni association which I tried to half-seriously jump start in February 1978 in a meeting in the old Golf Course clubhouse near Philcoa. We already then have 20 alumni members but a significant number of them were in medical school. So, of course, a gesture half in jest does not mean it can be sustained.

But one thing I remember until the time I left UP Diliman, there was no discussion ever about UP Ibalon as a “political organization”. This was not even discussed among the charter members in any length when the constitution was being drafted. The only discussion at length where this topic was tackled was in the Steering Committee [See my article, “The Formation And Legacy Of UP Ibalon: A Testimony”, 11/14/08] where it was roundly and unanimously rejected.

Years after that stormy August night [See my article, “The Calm Before The Storm: A UP Ibalon Saga”, 12/01/74], I needled the eminences grise of the original UG group of UP Ibalon. I asked them, “They said UP Ibalon was a political organization right from the very start”. “Of course not”, came the sharp reply in crisp English. “Saan naman nila nakuha iyon (Where did they got that?)”. And to think that the person was formerly a top staff of the supreme eminence grise.

I am confident that not one of the 110 members of UP Ibalon whom I came to know in my years in UP Diliman will affirm that UP Ibalon “ay poon-sa-poon, sarong political organization”. I have talked to over half of them over the years and all have no recollection that that term was ever used or discussed in referring to UP Ibalon. All the recollections about the nature of the organization was that it was a socio-cultural organization and a varsitarian.

I now dare those who said in 1995 that UP Ibalon is a “pol-org” to identify who told them that and what version of UP Ibalon history were they peddling then. I also dare them to produce even one among those 110 members I mentioned who will back their version of history.

Members should also know that years after that 1995 incident, and even before, they were peddling that false version of UP Ibalon history.

It is unfair to all members that a small cabal will try to “revise” UP Ibalon history when the founders and the senior members are still around. It is as if they are in a hurry to bury us all into oblivion.

It is also the duty of UP Ibalon to teach all the members the right version of history.

The Crying Lady and "Rimposon": A UP Ibalon Saga

December 1, 2008

by Mighty Baylon


The anniversary celebration of UP Ibalon and UPIAA on December 1, 1995 was more subdued than 1994 (which was the organization’s 20th anniversary). But it was no less attended. Its ambience was even better as it was held in the old house of Lodie Padilla and Delen Padilla-de la Paz in Magallanes Village, Makati.

In my recollection the personal highlight of the event came when Min Paje-Banzon, a charter member and UP Ibalon’s second President suggested and led the singing of the old Ibalon songs. So there was the oldies in center stage crooning the old songs with real feelings that it drew tears from some senior members. It was the songs we sang in caroling (no we didn’t use pure Christmas carols then) and we used some really old songs to serenade our old supporters like the late Dean Irene Cortes and Dr. Pablo Botor’s family. There is some controversy now which Ibalon song we usually hold for the finale but I remember in that occasion we used the ditty, “Rimposon”.

When tears were shed, I heard comments na iba daa an bonds and respect to each other kan old members. Yes, I participated in UP Ibalon’s 1994 caroling and I knew they no longer sang the old songs (no use in comparing the quality now). They don’t have our pambatos Raul Sabularse, Fem Espinas (Paladin), Nips Valenciano, Gods Lanuza, Toti Mesia and Eden Borja (Fernando), our soloist.

A short while later the reunion started to break up and I thought Gerlin, the President and me should send off the members and take care of those that can’t go home anymore. But Gerlin was nowhere to be found. I didn’t catch her sight after “Rimposon”.

It was only daybreak when I saw her again and she told me she would walk home somebody. I didn’t really mind it then. She just told me we should talk soon.

A few days later I saw her and her opening was, “Do you remember I was nowhere around when the members were leaving?”. Of course, I noticed. “I was keeping company with a lady who started shedding tears when you oldies sang the old Bicol songs and she walked away crying copiously when you sang “Rimposon”.

“She and her best friend told me everything they knew. She also gave leads to other organizations that are already a-forming”. With her revelations I felt the hair on my back stand. I know the calm is over and my worst fears are now happening before my eyes.

The two ladies, both members of the BOD are founders of the organization of students from a Bicol province. And they gave us leads on members and other personalities that are involved in the formation of other Bicol provincial organizations–those from Camarines Norte, those from Camarines Sur, those from Albay and those from Sorsogon.

Suddenly, hugging the top of the agenda of the UPIAA were no longer alumni matters. And the privileged information was with a caveat that it not reach the BOD of the resident organization and some other persons.

The alumni directors sought out the dramatis personae of the proto-organizations and tried to establish a background dialogue for after all they cannot be perceived traitors. I was at the UP Fair that is traditionally held in the middle of December. No, I wasn’t looking at the booths or exhibits. I was desperately looking for people who I want to talk to and people who can talk to them, people I have not met before in my life and young enough to be my sons and daughters. I felt I cannot go home yet to my family and business in Mindanao.

And all of these discoveries triggered by the oldies’ rendition of the old Bicol songs and “Rimposon”.

The Calm Before The Storm: A UP Ibalon Saga

December 1, 2008

by Mighty Baylon


I always fancied UP students to be bright. And as bright persons I thought they will be able to sift truth from facts. After all, UP was strong in empirical research.

I was hoping the queer incident I mentioned in my last article [“One Stormy Night In August 1995: A UP Ibalon Saga”, 12/01/08] will blow away after the contentious UP Student Council election. I thought that with the founders and senior members still around and being UP students they will not be brazen enough to change UP Ibalon’s history while we are still alive (but later it turned out that I was wrong in this).

It is with hope that I reminisced that though UP Paglaom was torn asunder by the CONCOMSA (Consultative Committee on Student Affairs, a predecessor organization before the full-pledged restoration of the UP Student Council) elections in 1974, it survived in the form of UP Ibalon [See my article, “The Formation And Legacy Of UP Ibalon: A Testimony”, 11/14/08]. And UP Ibalon lived to be the organization and home of the Bicolanos in UP Diliman and this is Ibalon’s legacy.

There were no other recognized UP Bicolano organizations at that time except for UP Lawod, the organization of students coming from Masbate [See my article, “A Multitude Of Bicolano Organizations In UP Diliman: The Present Problem And The Lessons Of The Past”, 11/15/08], which I didn’t really mind because Masbateno is considered a separate language and only a minority speaks Bicol in Masbate. But my initial impression of UP Ibalon is it is a small and troubled organization (a membership roll of 23 and with debts to pay). With a UP Diliman Bicolano population estimated to be 700 I can surmise that the situation is volatile.

We were asked by the President of UP Ibalon, Gerlin Catangui, to help in their upcoming traditional high school students’ contest, the Padunungan, which will be held in Legazpi City during the semestral break. It was Gerlin’s wish that the project earn enough so that all UP Ibalon debts will be paid and all unpublished souvenir programs of the previous years will be printed and distributed. She feels it was the shame of UP Ibalon that it cannot live to its commitment and promise to the donors and sponsors.

Flushed with the success of the premier of the movie “Congo”, I tapped my UPIAA Treasurer, Dan Daz, to help them out and teach them how to launch projects with enough sponsorship. Through Dan, UP Ibalon was able to tap former sponsors in “Congo”. We also tapped and the Ibalon alumni in Albay was enthusiastic in helping them on other logistical concerns. In my recollection of the project, the Ibalon couple Kulas and Lea Sala, Mac Pavia, Dean Jun Perdigon and the late George Evangelio comes to mind as the most active of its supporters.

The project achieved its highest goal and UP Ibalon’s debts were paid and all the souvenir program backlogs were erased. I thought it would usher a new era of mutually beneficial cooperation between the resident and alumni organizations of UP Ibalon. In my analysis of the “Congo” premiere, it was obvious that the UPIAA (UP Ibalon alumni Association) needs the warm bodies the UP Ibalon can provide and UPIAA can help the resident organization in a lot of ways.

It is thus with hope and enthusiasm that the resident and alumni organizations jointly prepared for the December 1, 1995 anniversary celebrations.

But illusions were soon shattered and this just turned out to be the proverbial calm before the storm.

One Stormy Night In August 1995:A UP Ibalon Saga

December 1, 2008

by Mighty Baylon


One very stormy night (there was a typhoon signal) in late August 1995, I was a little annoyed by an insistent phone call. I was busy packing my things for my 12 o’clock midnight SuperFerry trip back home to Mindanao and Cainta was a long way from the North Harbor. I worried that I would find it difficult to get a taxi ride with flash floods being broadcast. That was the reason I wanted to leave early.

The caller was a dear friend. To my surprise he was asking me to postpone my trip and attend a “special meeting” of the resident members. I wondered with irritation what very important topic needs to be discussed in the dead of a stormy night that warrants my presence in the resident organization. And to think I don’t normally show myself for their meetings or drop by in their tambayan.

“Please. The organization needs you”. That began to change my mind. As the founder I normally cannot turn down appeals by my organization.

There was no time to call SuperFerry. Usually their phones are swamped by calls when a ship is about to depart. I thought, “Okey, I will just take the ‘No-show’ charge”.

I didn’t know it then that I was about to embark on a journey of intrigue and struggle.

By the time I showed myself up in the old Drugstore in Balara my pants were soaked up to the knees even though I was using an umbrella and a jacket. I asked my friend, “What’s up?”. No, he won’t give me any details. I began to suspect that it was not a normal meeting. All I heard was “Board of Directors Plus”.

We took a taxi till we came to a small apartment in Balara. There were about 20 people present and I knew the Ibalon BOD consists of only 12 officers. Scanning them I knew I was among the members of the UG group in Ibalon.

The place was jampacked and the meeting began as soon as I arrived. Somebody, not a board member, began, “Aram man kan gabos na an Ibalon, poon sa poon, ay sarong political organization” (Everybody knows that Ibalon, right from the very start, is a political organization). I can scarcely believe my ears. Here it is, the very concept we rejected when we founded the organization. We knew even then that Ibalon cannot be a political or even a semi-political organization if it wants to be a home of the Bicolanos in UP Diliman.

“Dahil political organization man kita dapat magbale kita sa SAMASA” (Since we are a political organization we must join SAMASA). But he was referring to a particular faction of the SAMASA. And most of the BOD members don’t want to join either SAMASA factions so that Ibalon won’t be involved in the messy split of the national-democratic movement going on in the campus.

It now dawned on me why they invited me to this meeting. As the organization’s founder, they were expecting my crucial “imprimatur” to a scheme. They wanted to override all opposition with that (false) mantra of “pol-org”.

I was the first one asked for a reaction. “Where did you get the idea that Ibalon is a political organization?”, I asked them. “We rejected that at the very start and we defined Ibalon to be a varsitarian”.

I continued, “If anyone tried to establish a pol-org in 1974, when ‘white terror’ reigned in the campus and recognition of some organizations has just began, they would certainly ended up in Camp Crame. In fact, ND mass organizations like KM were being converted then into legal organizations”. I added, “Until 1974, residents of dormitories are still being dragged out by military men in the middle of the night and some students are arrested after stepping out of classrooms”.

Looking at their surprised but ashen faces I realized that my comment was the least they expected me to make. I was not out to defeat a scheme I was not privy to; I was only trying to stand for the truth and for the correct version of Ibalon history.

The meeting ended right there and only some lame talk remained. My optimistic side was thinking, “I hope that will be the end of it” but my pessimistic side was also saying, “This is just the beginning. Their political minders won’t take it sitting down”.

I reported the incident to the UP Ibalon Alumni Association Board of Directors, which I headed.

When I took a different ship a few days later, I cannot erase from my mind that queer episode. With chill in my spine I cannot shake the feeling I am being sucked in an intrigue that I feel will impact UP Ibalon and my life.

The MDs Of UP Ibalon Of Earlier Years

November 15, 2008


In my four years in UP Diliman covering 1974-77, the UP Ibalon produced 19 Doctors of Medicine or an average of nearly five per year. I can only offer two explanations for this. One, the best and brightest of Bicolano students were then in Ibalon. And second, since it was martial law the students were not keen to take up Law (In fact only one of the 110 or so members of the organization in that period took up Law but he happened to become an abogado de campanilla: Atty. Joel Cadiz).

The Charter Batch produced 5 M.D.s. They are:
1. Delen Padilla-de la Paz, our nominee for the Diamonds in the Rough award, who specializes in Community Medicine. She is connected to the Social Medicine Unit of the PGH. She is active in many NGOs and causes and you can sometimes see her on TV as a street parliamentarian. A Manila native, Delen lived in Legazpi City for six years, enabling her to learn Bicol. Her husband Boying is a surgeon at the PGH.
2. Totie Mesia, a now-retired pathologist based in New York City, debilitated by a chronic illness. Currently, he is specializing in Journalism. But you can still easily ask him about health matters. Bako lang an mga gadan an aram niya. Totie is a native of Naga City and it is obvious in his writings that he loves Naga more than New York.
3. Ray Rayel, a cardiologist based in Wisconsin, noted for his rollicky humor and friendly manner. He can easily make his tense patient relax by spinning joke after joke until the BP drops to normal. Ray is the proud son of Polangui, Albay.
4. Eden Lao, our long-lost surgeon who reputedly married the Olivia Hussey of Naga, beating many Atenistas to their dream girl. Eden hailed from Iriga City.
5. Joey Jaucian, who soon left for the US after his studies at UP-PGH. Joey is a native of Ligao City.

Ibalon Batch 75-A produced three doctors. They are:
1. Arnel Malaya, the current Dean of College of Physical Therapy and the Chair of Rehabilitation Medicine at UERM. Kun makulog an kasu-kasuan nindo ay he can straighten it out. Also see him if ever your son or daughter enrols in UERM. Arnel hailed from Iriga City
2. Julius Lecciones, once connected to the company that markets Depo-Provera (because he has many children daw), he is now the Medical Director of the Philippine Children’s Medical Center. A TOYM awardee, he is a pediatric oncologist publishing so many papers. A living proof that someone born at the end of the world can rise to the top. Marhay ta natukduan nin Bicol ninda Ray and Totie kaya nakalaog sa Ibalon (ta palibhasa nag-abot sa Molave na an taramon Cebuano ta taga-Pio V. Corpus,Masbate).
3. Nips Valenciano, who practices medicine in the Middle East and going by a linked article it seems he is active in the Filipino community there. Nips is a native of Buhi, Camarines Sur.

Ibalon Batch 75-B produced four doctors:
1. Andy Gimpaya, a former government doctor in Samar, he is now specializing in Computer Programming and Net enterpreneurship. He is our beloved website administrator. Lani Palencia told me that when Andy came back to Naga bako man daa medical practice an binakal ni Andy kundi tennis practice. You can also go to him if you need construction materials or if you need some Web or Net services.
2. Amy Goleta-Dy, a pediatric oncologist based in St. Luke’s, you can also come to her if you need wellness products and you will even be helping indigent cancer patients who are beneficiaries of the products she helps market. Her husband is a surgical oncologist at St. Luke’s. Amy’s hometown is Bula, Camarines Sur.
3. Boy Remo, an internist who practices in Missouri, and who is a frequent visitor to his hometown of Goa (and a townmate of Andy). It seems Caramoan Peninsula is his favorite destination nowadays.
4. Eden Borja-Fernando, our very gracious host and sponsor who is a renowned obstetrician-gynecologist in Naga City. Her base is the Plaza Medica. I was advised that she wants no higher praise than this. A resident successively of Siruma, Tinambac and Canaman, Camarines Sur. She is the one to see kun mangangaki an an agom nindo.

Ibalon Batch 76-A produced a lone doctor in Susan Princesa-Mallonga who is based in Vancouver, Canada but who shuttles and works here now and then so that their family won’t lose their Philippine roots.

Ibalon Batch 76-B produced four doctors:
1. Annelee Badiola-Lojo, an obstetrician-gynecologist connected with Las Pinas Medical Center and a Department Chair. An eternal Ibalon supporter whose Naga house is always open to Ibalonians, she is well-liked by everyone. A frequent visitor to Naga, it seems her recent haunt is New York City. Her husband Rommel, an Ibalon friend, is a surgeon.
2. Abet Guballa, an opthalmologist in Medical City and the Section Chief for Comprehensive Opthalmology in that institution. A sometime Naga visitor we hope he can set up a clinic in his hometown in the near future so that those with eye problems need not go to Manila anymore.
3. Ningning Joson-Villanueva, a practicing pediatric cardiologist at the Davao Doctors Medical Center. Her husband, Dr. Noel Villanueva is my nephrologist. Siyempre may istoryang Bikol pag nasa clinic ninda ako kaya napapanganga su ibang pasyente. She hails from Naga City
4. Pat Litam, a hematologist practicing in Ohio. He is a native of Naga City.
(Puro daw taga-Naga ining apat. Garo nag-orolay.)

The two batches of Ibalon in 1977 produced two doctors:
1. Ed Lim, an allergologist-immunologist based at the PGH and a section chief in that renowned institution.
2. Godo Garcia, a graduate of the UP College of Medicine, he now practices in the US.

Ten of the 19 are members of our e-group.

Additionally, there are two other Ibalonians who are familiar to us who are also doctors and just junior by a few years to them. Dai ko sinda inabutan sa UP but I know the first:
1. Penny Robredo-Bundoc, the Department Chair of Rehabilitation Medicine in PGH. A native of Naga, she is the sister of Butch and Mayor Jesse Robredo, two figures familiar to us. Her husband Pipo is a spine surgeon at the PGH and a TOYM awardee. Penny is also a member of our e-group.
2. Imelda Torres-Reyes, a UP College of Medicine graduate is a practicing pediatric cardiologist in Naga City. She was the first to detect something wrong in Pitoy’s angel.

An masasabi ko puro totoo saka maboboot na tawo an mga doktor ta. Never be afraid to approach them. Iistoryahan pa kamo ki kadakol. Puwede man na online.

They are also Ibalon’s pride.